Waking from colonial dreams and post-colonial nightmares

Heart of Darkness.jpgYour Salonniere is excited and honored to be presenting at the 18th Annual Conference of ACTC: Association for Core Texts and Courses, “Liberal Arts Education and the World: Inquiring into, Preparing for and Living in the Real World Through Core Texts” in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

The presented paper: “We’re All Others Now: Revisiting Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness in the Age of Post-post-colonialism.”

Abstract:

In 1977, Chinua Achebe, through his essay, “An Image of Africa” tried and sentenced Joseph Conrad for being a “bloody racist,” charging that his novel, Heart of Darkness, captured Western imagination at its worst. In light of post-colonial theory, every culture and nation affected by Empire, both colonized and colonizer, was then shackled to a shared and brutal past. Post-colonial theorists like Achebe sought retribution and used discourse as a means of justice. Now that we’ve woken from colonial dreams and post-colonial nightmares of imagined communities, how do we read and critique a text like Conrad’s Heart of Darkness? And, if “multiculturalism has failed,” or if we believe it is possible to “transcend race,” what comes after post-colonial theory?

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